This is a very unexplored area in parenting in a lot of cases, and since it is a cultural moment in the news and media lately, we wanted to touch on this topic in the last two episodes. Where can we seek more consent with our children? This is part two of a two-part episode on consent.

What are the gray areas of consent? We ran out of time to touch on this one in the last episode, so we finish the discussion in this episode.

Before we get started, we’d like to invite you to join us on Facebook! We have both a Facebook Page (https://www.facebook.com/onefreefamily/) where you can stay informed of our new episodes and blog posts, and a Facebook Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/onefreefamily/) where you can join in on the discussion with us, whether you are already on the journey to applying peaceful parenting, or if you are skeptical and want to know more.

Forced obligations are usually not meaningful. Authentic engagements are usually much more meaningful. Should we expect more from our children than we expect from our friends? One way to handle engagements is to work to find common shared interests to bring about those authentic engagements.

This does not only involve interactions with parents. It is also important when your kids get together with other kids. Should you require your kids to engage with other kids or give them space to do as they wish?

Planting seeds can give you a good running start to reach that authenticity.

What happens if everyone in your family except one consents to go somewhere such as the library, or, say to Mexico on vacation? How do we handle that?

Sometimes it may be impossible to find space for consent, such as when your child could be physically endangering themselves or you are just not comfortable with the risk they may be taking. Another area where this is a challenge is when it is medical or health-related, such a vaccines, brushing teeth, or any number of other areas. It can be very helpful to have conversations and work to validate concerns and feelings in these areas with your child.

One way kids may challenge their autonomy is when they infringe on the rights or autonomy of others. To us, there is no space for anyone in our family to infringe on the bodily autonomy of others.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!